PX > CX > UX = #usable + #feels_fast + #was_emotive <-- the battle for business supremacy

Over the last few years I have become inspired or perhaps possessed with a certain awe about how touch interfaces, Mobile, Cloud and Social have converged to change the focus of most successful organizations from delivering usable products to delivering meaningful and pleasurable experiences worth sharing. Digital experience influences more and more of our business landscape from how customers find us, to how they learn about and perceive our reputation, to their on-boarding experience. It’s the experience to date (hey I just made up a new term ETD), the sum of the whole experience delivered to the PEOPLE who are our users, that drives this.

Delivering experiences that people feel good about, find memorable and want to share is the next battle for business supremacy.

I’ve suggested previously, because our users are people, and understanding the customer journey and how to deliver amazing experiences starts with people, this should not be the practice of customer experience (CX) but rather people experience (PX). Further, if we are focussing for today (and we are) on digital experiences then we are really talking about user experience (UX).

I would suggest to you that this equation holds true:

PX > CX > UX = #usable + #feels_fast + #was_emotive

Of course, this is rooted in the fact that software systems are now systems of engagement and not just systems of record. We count on our software systems to help improve our reputation with our customers and our software systems to help our employees improve our reputation with customers. Every software system built ultimately has an impact on People Experience. And I want to emphasize how important it is that even our internal systems provide pleasurable experiences to employees. Because happy employees make for happy customers.

Aberdeen Research interpretation of Andrew's CX hierarchy

Aberdeen Research interpretation of Andrew’s CX hierarchy

This concept is borrowed from a slideshare (slide 15) by Steven Anderson in 2006 and the clarified graphic is courtesy of Aberdeen Research.

They are both a refinement of some previous research from Carnegie Mellon on human computer interfaces in the early 90s.

This is what we all should be striving for in the software systems that drive our interactions with customers and prospects. And also the software systems that support real-world interactions that support our employees or inventory or return process. What does this refined CX pyramid look like to you? Does it remind you of Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs. Take a look.

maslow

Just like with Maslow’s Hierarchy the basic needs and basic tasks at the bottom are much easier to achieve than the needs at the top like self-actualization. And yet, that is what is required of everyone involved in designing customer experiences now.

How can we build applications that create pleasurable experiences? By understanding the PEOPLE who will be using them. That’s probably a lot easier than self-actualizing.

Understand the people who are your users and do more than help them get it done – strive for delight. Think about those smaller parts of the interaction that don’t require building the starship enterprise. The Kano model is a good strategy here. Where could you introduce parts of the interaction that are different and appealing?

Let’s look at one ingenious example in the Travel aggregation space – Hipmunk.com. Search for any flight…go ahead. Notice that cute little button in the sort bar that says sort by “agony.” How can that not make you smile if you’ve every travelled through airports?

What appealing little capabilities are you adding to your UX to help delight people?

Ken

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