Unified Monitoring – the new monitoring renaissance has a moniker

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I’ve been seeing a lot of marketing leveraging the term Unified Monitoring lately. At times it’s made me smirk but mostly smile. Let me explain.

It’s made me smirk because once again what’s old is new.

Many of the infrastructure components of Unified Monitoring have been a part of Enterprise Systems Management tools for more than 20 years. IBM, BMC, and CA products have offered dashboards, event management, correlation, reporting and service level management for as long as I can remember and I have a fair amount of gray hair :)

What’s so compelling is to maximize customer experience in the real-time digital enterprise we are re-imagining traditional management systems. Existing network and systems management capabilities are being enhanced with easy-to-use web based access, big data powered analytics, and more focused APM capabilities including visitor behavioral data. Put all of that capability in a well-defined, self-service pricing model bringing it to hundreds of thousands of companies and not just blue chip enterprises and you can start to see the potential.

This is making me smile a big toothy grin!

I’ve suggested before that we are in the great monitoring renaissance and I think that the term Unified Monitoring is probably the arrowhead that all this is lining up behind.

For years we have heard the term business alignment to help IT do the right thing. In tomorrow’s successful digital enterprise there will be no clear lines between business and IT. There will just be teams of specialists all working on part of the customer experience, the business. And, those teams will include IT people and UX people and marketing people and customer support people.

Do you remember, back in middle-school, the way the science book used to have those cellophanes of the human body systems? The skeleton, muscular, circulatory, organs layers. I’ve always had this vision that we could do the same for our customer experience delivery stack. Business results come from user behaviors that are the result of user experience delivered by application performance supported by the technology delivery stack.

Layering the business like this allows the team to focus on business results. And it let’s the teams focus on building a user experience first and then the technology required to support that. Combine the above visualization of the layers with powerful anomaly detection and statistical algorithms and you now have a competent and logical artificial intellect helping you deliver, manage and optimize the customer experience. Add marketing analytics, financial and supply chain data and we might be able to imagine closed-loop, machine learning powered Business Resource Planning.

I’m excited about the future of Unified Monitoring and you should be too!

Am I being too utopian?

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